Boukète, Liège (Belgium)

28 Dec

Boukète, next to the crêpe with Nutella.

 

After my brisk walk from the Liège-Guillemins station to the center of Liège, I was feeling a tad peckish and in need of a nice mid-morning snack. The streets of the Carré and surrounding areas were in holiday mood, and the Village de Noël was in full swing, so I decided that the best place to find something tasty would be at one of the many market stalls, found either surrounding the holiday ice-skating rink in the Place de la Cathédrale or a few streets away in Liège’s main square, the Place St Lambert.

While many of the Christmas markets I’ve been to seem to specialize mostly in selling cheap tat, I was pleased to discover that in Liège, the market was quite different. I thought to myself, Liège has the right idea, for the city’s reputation as a food-and-drink loving place was certainly à l’honneur here: the stalls seemed to simply ooze with a mind-boggling collection of fattening foodstuffs and heavily alcoholic beverages. Though I arrived at the market at a mere 11 o’clock in the morning – in most places, even in Belgium, considered a bit too early to tuck in to a hearty portion of fries or to down the first beer of the day – the stalls were filled with market-goers happily guzzling beer and pekèt, a locally distilled jenever mostly served in shot-glass form. As these customers imbibed, they also availed themselves of the many foods available at the market: huge sausages served with onions, giant portions of fries, smoutebollen (here known as croustillants), waffles, crêpes, churros, empanadas, massepain….

 

Traditional Liégeois waistline.

 

Though I tried to convince myself that I should follow the locals’ example and have a nice heavy dish, I was more in the mood for a light snack to tide me over until I could sit down for a more hearty lunchtime meal. I decided that a crêpe would be perfect. But not just any crêpe: a boukète, a Liégeois specialty, would be my selection of choice. Typically consumed either at the Fête du 15 Août, the traditional celebration of Liège, or around Christmas-time, the boukète is a simple buckwheat-and-egg crêpe, pan-fried with a bit of lard, and covered with plump Corinthian raisins and dusted with cane sugar. Alternatively, the boukète is filled with sirop de Liège, a form of apple and pear butter that I find to be diabetes-inducingly sweet, but fortunately there was none to be found in the delicious crêpe at the Christmas market stall.

 

Preparing the boukète.

 

Formerly known as the ‘boukète à rètchon‘ or ‘spit crêpe’ in Wallon, referring to the rather disgusting way that crêpe makers used to spit in the pan to make sure it was hot before pouring in the dough, boukète is derived from the Dutch ‘boekweit,’ or buckwheat in English. Often used in savory crêpes in France, buckwheat creates a mixture much less sweet than the traditional crêpe dough, made using plain flour, milk, butter, eggs and sugar. Pairing the more savory buckwheat with a dusting of sugar is a lovely combination, as the sugar provides just a smidgen of sweetness, without becoming overpowering. Though I’m not at all a fan of raisins (see my post on the cramique bread), the Corinthian raisins in the boukète I tried were plump and juicy, and did not have the gnarly, chewy texture that I so dislike. Indeed, they burst with flavor in such a way that I suspect that they had been soaked in liqueur for a few hours, which is generally the only way that I’ll even consider eating raisins. The boukète is thus simple but tasty, and I very much enjoyed the subtle layering of textures: the eggy smoothness of the crêpe, the juicy, yielding flesh of the raisin, and the oomphy crunch of the cane sugar.

As the crêpe mixture used to make boukète is fairly standard, I will not provide a recipe here. If you desire to make boukète at home, simply substitute regular flour for buckwheat in your dough, soak juicy raisins in liqueur (preferably rum or a white eau-de-vie) for as long as possible, and dust the whole thing with brown sugar. Voilà!

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