Massepain Cuit, Liège (Belgium)

12 Jan

Massepain cuit in various shapes, in Liège.

 

Rather cold after perusing the Christmas market in Liège, I decided to take a break from the frosty weather and check out the Passage Lemonnier, the oldest covered passage in Belgium and reputed for its chic shops. Constructed in the 1830’s, this gallery is nearly as old as Belgium itself. The gallery was simply mobbed with holiday shoppers, making window-shopping difficult, but I quickly stopped in my tracks as I smelled something sweet and freshly baked. As luck would have it, I found a rather modestly decorated shop simply gorged with customers and serving a traditional liegeois (and Belgian) holiday treat: massepain cuit.

Massepain, otherwise known as marzipan, is quite simple, but most delicious: a combination of almond paste and sugar. In Wallonia, it is quite commonly served at Christmas-time, often in a variety of decorative shapes, notably in the form of cochonnets roses or little piggies, in English. While most massepain or marzipan is simply served when the paste dries, in Liège and surrounding areas, it is quite common to actually bake the marzipan with a touch of orange blossom water, and to serve it as ‘massepain cuit‘ or ‘cooked marzipan.’ The massepain cuit that I was able to sample was served in large blocks shaped like leaves.


Massepain cuit.

 

Cooked on low heat for about 20 min, the cooked marzipan forms a thin, slightly crunchy crust, and the interior retains the same texture as  raw marzipan. I love the  lovely combination of textures: a lovely crunch from the crust, and then a smooth, slightly sour middle layer from the marzipan loaf, and then a lip-smacking citrus-y aftertaste from the few drops of orange blossom water. Cut into small pieces, this massepain cuit is a perfect accompaniment to coffee, as the hint of bitterness from the almonds pairs well with a rich, strong, inky black espresso. Keep a block or two on your countertop, and it’ll be difficult to resist!


Cross-section of the massepain cuit. Note the thin crust, and the more traditional-looking marzipan center.

 

For those of you who’d like to create massepain cuit, albeit not necessarily moulded into a decorative shape, at home, the recipe is MOST simple:

  • 125g (4.4oz) almond powder (crushed almonds)
  • 125g (4.4oz) caster sugar
  • 3 or so drops orange blossom water, to taste
  • 80g (2.8oz) softened butter
  • 1 egg white, lightly beaten

In a large bowl, knead the butter with the almond powder and sugar, in order to form dough. Then add the egg white and orange blossom water and knead the dough until it is firm and not very sticky. Then cover and refrigerate for about 2 hours.

Once the dough has been refrigerated, preheat the oven to 150°C/300°F. Then roll dough out with a rolling pin and place the dough on a lined and greased baking tray. The dough should be about 5cm/2in thick.

Bake the dough for about 5 min, and then turn off the oven. Let the dough sit in the oven for about an hour. Then take out the massepain, and cut it into 6 to 8 pieces.

Then preheat the oven to 150°C/300°F and place the rack in the grill position. Bake the massepain for about 5 min in order to make the top golden, and then flip over the massepain and let the other side grill for 5 min. Then let cool and serve…yum!


Couldn't resist cutting a few slices for myself....

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