Tag Archives: Wallonia

Lettres farcies, Liège (Belgium)

14 Jan
Lettres farcies. Note the puff pastry, marzipan and citrus layers.

Lettres farcies. Note the puff pastry, marzipan and citrus layers.

While gazing at the beautiful blocks of massepain at the Traiteur Jean-Marie at the Passage Lemonnier in Liège, I noticed something odd: a customer approached the counter, asked for something in a hushed voice, and the shopkeeper scuttled off to the oven to scoop out a small bundle, placing it furtively in a paper bag. My curiosity was piqued: why was she being so secretive? Always curious to sample new things, especially baked goods, I thus had the temerity to ask her what was in the oven. She asked me if I had ever tried lettres farcies. I quickly replied to the contrary, and she let out a ‘dis, hein!’, perhaps the most oft-uttered pair of words in Wallonia.

Quickly explaining to me what lettres farcies were, she also told me to wait a few minutes as a freshly prepared batch were almost ready to come out of the oven, piping hot. And then they arrived, and she presented me with a number of S-shaped mini-pastries. Upon trying one, I was hooked, and purchased them all….. So what are these lettres farcies? Well, the English translation for them is ‘stuffed letters,’ which I’ll admit doesn’t sound very appetizing. Oh, but don’t be fooled by the name! The term lettres farcies, while perhaps not very toothsome to the ear, is extremely literal: these small objects are in fact puff pastry in the shape of alphabetical letters, and stuffed with a mixture of marzipan and candied fruits. The combination is dynamite: my teeth sank into the light, airiness of the puff pastry, only to meet a denser middle layer composed of the smooth ooze of marzipan and titillating juiciness of the candied citrus, in this case grapefruit. I’m told that the most common fruit used in their production is generally cherry.


Lettres farcies, just out of the oven. *Drool*

‘Tis a pity that these delectable morsels are generally available around the holiday season:  I would be thrilled to gobble them up at ANY time.


Lettres farcies: a scrumptious snack on the train.

Massepain Cuit, Liège (Belgium)

12 Jan

Massepain cuit in various shapes, in Liège.

 

Rather cold after perusing the Christmas market in Liège, I decided to take a break from the frosty weather and check out the Passage Lemonnier, the oldest covered passage in Belgium and reputed for its chic shops. Constructed in the 1830’s, this gallery is nearly as old as Belgium itself. The gallery was simply mobbed with holiday shoppers, making window-shopping difficult, but I quickly stopped in my tracks as I smelled something sweet and freshly baked. As luck would have it, I found a rather modestly decorated shop simply gorged with customers and serving a traditional liegeois (and Belgian) holiday treat: massepain cuit.

Massepain, otherwise known as marzipan, is quite simple, but most delicious: a combination of almond paste and sugar. In Wallonia, it is quite commonly served at Christmas-time, often in a variety of decorative shapes, notably in the form of cochonnets roses or little piggies, in English. While most massepain or marzipan is simply served when the paste dries, in Liège and surrounding areas, it is quite common to actually bake the marzipan with a touch of orange blossom water, and to serve it as ‘massepain cuit‘ or ‘cooked marzipan.’ The massepain cuit that I was able to sample was served in large blocks shaped like leaves.


Massepain cuit.

 

Cooked on low heat for about 20 min, the cooked marzipan forms a thin, slightly crunchy crust, and the interior retains the same texture as  raw marzipan. I love the  lovely combination of textures: a lovely crunch from the crust, and then a smooth, slightly sour middle layer from the marzipan loaf, and then a lip-smacking citrus-y aftertaste from the few drops of orange blossom water. Cut into small pieces, this massepain cuit is a perfect accompaniment to coffee, as the hint of bitterness from the almonds pairs well with a rich, strong, inky black espresso. Keep a block or two on your countertop, and it’ll be difficult to resist!


Cross-section of the massepain cuit. Note the thin crust, and the more traditional-looking marzipan center.

 

For those of you who’d like to create massepain cuit, albeit not necessarily moulded into a decorative shape, at home, the recipe is MOST simple:

  • 125g (4.4oz) almond powder (crushed almonds)
  • 125g (4.4oz) caster sugar
  • 3 or so drops orange blossom water, to taste
  • 80g (2.8oz) softened butter
  • 1 egg white, lightly beaten

In a large bowl, knead the butter with the almond powder and sugar, in order to form dough. Then add the egg white and orange blossom water and knead the dough until it is firm and not very sticky. Then cover and refrigerate for about 2 hours.

Once the dough has been refrigerated, preheat the oven to 150°C/300°F. Then roll dough out with a rolling pin and place the dough on a lined and greased baking tray. The dough should be about 5cm/2in thick.

Bake the dough for about 5 min, and then turn off the oven. Let the dough sit in the oven for about an hour. Then take out the massepain, and cut it into 6 to 8 pieces.

Then preheat the oven to 150°C/300°F and place the rack in the grill position. Bake the massepain for about 5 min in order to make the top golden, and then flip over the massepain and let the other side grill for 5 min. Then let cool and serve…yum!


Couldn't resist cutting a few slices for myself....

Liège (Belgium)

27 Dec

Liège.

First of all, I’d like to apologize to my faithful blog readers for the lack of articles published recently. As December is concert-going season, I’ve been quite busy playing opera most nights, and my days have been more or less filled with the usual holiday odds-and-ends, and especially with baking. Mmmmm. Combine a hectic schedule with prolonged wintry weather, and suddenly mobility – as well as time to write – comes to a halt. That being said, I was able to visit two dessert destinations this month, Liège and Eupen (stay tuned for the Eupener post).

I must admit that my trip to Liège was more or less completely unplanned, as I had very little desire to go there. Having never visited the German-speaking portion of Belgium, I was more excited about the Weinachtsmarkt in Eupen, but I discovered that the market didn’t open until mid-afternoon and I needed to go somewhere in the mean time. Liège, the only stop on the train from Brussels to Eupen that I hadn’t already visited, was the logical place to hang out for a few hours, whilst I waited for what I thought would be a bratwurst- and küchen-filled Germanic paradise. I’m thrilled that I made this unplanned stop in Liège, as I quite enjoyed the city, and the trip to Eupen proved to be most disappointing (but more on that in another post).

For those of you unfamiliar with Liège, or with Belgian politics, let me just explain that Liège – or Lièèèèèèèèèèèèètch, pronounced with the rather rustic local accent – does not at all enjoy a positive reputation. A former industrial powerhouse having been subject to urban decay for the past 50 years or so, Liège is known to most in Belgium – especially those from Brussels or from Flanders – as a complete dump. Second largest city in French-speaking Wallonia after Charleroi, the city is and always has been run by the notoriously corruption-plagued Parti Socialiste. The alcohol-infused speeches of Liège’s most famous and popular politican, Michael Daerden, known in these parts as Papa, do not help matters much, especially as YouTube has made Daerden famous around the globe. Here’s an example:

Despite the negative things I might have heard about Liège, the city is quite famous for its food (anything with the word liégeois in the title, such as café liégeois, gaufres liégeoises or salade liégeoise, usually is extraordinarily unhealthy but quite tasty!), so I decided to walk around the city for a few hours before heading to Eupen. The cité ardente, or ardent city, is also well-known for its high consumption of alcohol, so I thought, well, at least I could have a waffle and maybe a beer or two before heading on to something better.

Pèket, a type of Jenever, available at the Liège Christmas market.

 

I could not have been more pleasantly surprised. My first impressions of the city were excellent. The newly renovated Liège-Guillemins train station, designed by the world-famous Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava, is quite simply breath-taking. It is difficult to describe the sensation of airiness and space that one feels in the station, but to me arriving in the station felt like I was heading directly into a highly-structured cloud, bizarre as that may sound. In any case, I could NOT stop taking pictures of the station, both from inside and out.


The fantastic Liège-Guillemins station.

 

Once I managed to tear myself away from the gorgeous station, I decided to head to the pedestrian heart of the city, the central part of which is known as the Carré (square, in English), a 100×100 meter maze of streets. Gently strolling down the long hill upon which the station is situated, I soon came across the lovely Parc d’Avroy, complete with pond, and flanked by handsome apartment buildings. This was not the dank, unpleasant city that I had so often heard about! Ambling quite happily through the park – in spite of the glacial wind – I soon came to the heart of Liège, bustling with holiday shoppers.


Parc d'Avroy and nice buildings.

 

As I wandered through the festively decorated pedestrian streets, another of my preconceptions about the city was immediately proven wrong. First and foremost, I was surprised that there were so many Flemish people wandering about. If I were to believe the francophone Belgian media, Flemish people never deign to enter Wallonia, except maybe to go on vacation in the beautiful forests of the Ardenne(s) or perhaps to experience the Charleroi Adventure, a safari through Wallonia’s largest city, believed by the Flemish to be the ugliest city in the world. However, almost everyone around me on a cold December Saturday was babbling away in Flemish! Most of them happened to be older women, and so I suspect that they were in town to see the Christmas market, one of Europe’s largest, but I was nonetheless highly surprised to hear so much Flemish spoken in what is often known as a bastion of Francophone culture.


A representative selection of the Christmas market shoppers.

 

For, I had always been told that Liège is quite ‘typically French.’ To quote Flemish chef Ruth van Waerebeek’s cookbook Everyone Eats Well in Belgium,  “So much is francophile Liège influenced by Paris that many Belgians feel that visiting Liège is almost as good as going abroad.” Though I think that both her cookbook and her viewpoints are much more Flemish than Belgian, she is correct: Liège felt very different from the other places I had been in Belgium. However, rather than believing myself to be France, I had the sensation that I was in a French-speaking Germany, the city’s rather stylish pedestrian areas and main square, the Place Saint Lambert, reminding me of the German Fuβgängerzonen and its architecture looking decidedly teutonic. Indeed, the German border and the large city of Aachen are located only a few kilometers away from Liège, so this Germanic impression is quite logical.


Charming and Germanic-looking Liège.

 

However, I’m pleased to report that the one positive stereotype I’d heard about the city – its wonderful food – was entirely correct. Though my stay in the city was a short one – and believe me, I’m looking forward to another trip to Liège – I was able to taste a variety dessert specialties, including the world-famous Liège waffles, a type of crèpe known as boukète, two types of marzipan (massepin cuit and lettres farcies), and melocakes, found throughout Belgium. This post is simply an introduction to my trip to Liège, as I prefer to devote a post to each one of these desserts. In the meantime, I’ll simply say that I left Liège with a smile on my face and a pleasantly full stomach.


Everything IS good in Liège! (well, as far as food is concerned!)

 

Sometimes, unexpected pleasures are the best!


Be careful not to eat or drink too much in Liège, or else.....